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Preserving Holiday Leftovers

Preserving Holiday Leftovers


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If there’s one thing that the holidays bring aside from cherished time with friends and family – it’s leftovers. You’re likely about to face, if you haven’t already, a plethora of leftover holiday cookies, fruit trays, vegetable platters, ham, turkey, pies, salads and more! It’s often daunting trying to organize and use up all of your leftovers and even more frustrating when you pull them out, only to realize that they’ve gone to waste.

Today, we’re sharing some of our favorite tips for using up all of those leftover foods – and keeping them fresh for up to 5x longer than traditional storage methods – this holiday season!

A simple and favorite appetizer dish during the holidays is definitely the crudité platter. We’ve often found ourselves with a mountain of 1 or 2 of the vegetables left on the platter at the end of the evening. A great way to reimagine these leftovers is to turn them into a roasted vegetable medley, like this one from Kristy Bernardo of The Wicked Noodle. The best part? This recipe can be made with just about any vegetable you like, so feel free to use whatever leftovers you have!

FoodSaver® spokesperson and host of Southern at Heart on the Food Network, Damaris Phillips, also has some great tips for managing holiday leftovers! Send guests home with seconds (or thirds!) of their favorite dishes– it’s an added touch that sends your love home with friends and family. You can keep the custom portions fresh by removing the air and sealing them in FoodSaver® zipper bags to take home. Make sure to save some extra for yourself too – throwing extra turkey meat in the deep freezer now means you’ll be ready to whip up some delicious turkey chili on the next snow day!

One thing we never let ourselves take for granted is our slow cooker. And as things start to pile up in the refrigerator and freezer around the holidays, we couldn’t be more thankful for them! We love this recipe for Creamy Chicken and Dumplings because you’ll likely have the majority of the ingredients hanging around at this time of year anyways!

Finally, not every family may have this problem, but have you ever wondered what to do with a half-full bottle of wine after hosting a holiday party? Paired with the FoodSaver® FM5000 for an airtight seal, the FoodSaver® Bottle Stopper helps preserve the quality of your wine, keeping flavors in and air particles out.

What are your tried and true tips for using up holiday leftovers? We’d love to hear! Share with us on social @FoodSaver!

For more information visit www.FoodSaver.com and www.foodsaver.com/blog


How to Make Preserved Lemons&mdashand What to Do With Them Once You Do

Until recently, preserved lemons turned up mostly in Moroccan tagines and other North Africans stews, as well as some Middle Eastern dishes. But they’re definitely migrating to take their place in a well-stocked multi-ethnic home pantry. The jarred versions𠅊nd there are definitely some good ones out there𠅊re often so long preserved that their flavor becomes a bit acrid, intensely bitter and rocketfuel-esque. So if you’re at all a lemonhead, you’ll definitely want to start making your own.

At its most traditional, this means cutting whole lemons, rubbing them all over with coarse salt, and then packing them in a jar with salt and lemon juice to cover. You leave them at room temperature for 4 or 5 weeks to ferment, and then you can refrigerate them until you use them up. Another bonus of making your own preserved lemons is that the pulp, which so many recipes tell you to scrape out and discard, is actually fantastic for muddling into cocktails, pureeing into dips, adding to soups, sauces and stews, and mixing into your next pot of greens.

Here are just two examples of how to make preserved lemons:

Preserved Lemons: This is the classic version. Simple and effective.

Lemon Confit: Chef Eric Ripert&aposs lemon confit uses a sugar-salt mix. "I add lemon confit to so many dishes𠅏rom broiled fish to pork and beans," he says. He blends his lemon confit with butter to add a pleasantly pungent flavor to a broiled snapper. Before broiling, he dots some of the lemon butter on the fish, then serves more lemon butter on the side.

Once you&aposve mastered the preserved lemons, here are a few suggestions for what to do with them:

Broccoli with Preserved Lemon Yogurt: We loved this recipe so much we put it on the cover of the magazine! Of course the broccoli is fantastic, but it’s the yogurt sauce flavored with preserved lemon that’s the star. Once you make it, you’ll want to eat it on everything, from grilled bread and eggplant and okra, to shrimp or chicken kebabs, to lamb meatballs and baked white and sweet potatoes or squash.

Roasted Peppers with Preserved Lemon and Capers: In this typical Middle Eastern dish, preserved lemon offsets the sweetness of the peppers and adds an exotic dimension to the simply cooked vegetables.

Pan-Seared Cod with Preserved Lemon Aioli: Obviously lemon and fish go together like peanut butter and jelly, but the best takeaway from this recipe and the following one, besides the perfect fish cooking technique, are the super versatile sauces—the preserved lemon aioli that will up your sandwich game immensely and become your go-to mayo.

Trout with Preserved Lemon Vinaigrette: This quick dish from chef Viet Pham features trout fillets in a bright and tangy vinaigrette—which will quickly become the dressing for all of your grain and green salads this season.

Couscous with Red Lentils and Easy Preserved Lemons: If you’ve only got 20 minutes, this clever almost-instant take on preserved lemons is definitely worth a shot. It’s not traditional by any means, but it’s the perfect gateway to the real thing.


How to Make Preserved Lemons&mdashand What to Do With Them Once You Do

Until recently, preserved lemons turned up mostly in Moroccan tagines and other North Africans stews, as well as some Middle Eastern dishes. But they’re definitely migrating to take their place in a well-stocked multi-ethnic home pantry. The jarred versions𠅊nd there are definitely some good ones out there𠅊re often so long preserved that their flavor becomes a bit acrid, intensely bitter and rocketfuel-esque. So if you’re at all a lemonhead, you’ll definitely want to start making your own.

At its most traditional, this means cutting whole lemons, rubbing them all over with coarse salt, and then packing them in a jar with salt and lemon juice to cover. You leave them at room temperature for 4 or 5 weeks to ferment, and then you can refrigerate them until you use them up. Another bonus of making your own preserved lemons is that the pulp, which so many recipes tell you to scrape out and discard, is actually fantastic for muddling into cocktails, pureeing into dips, adding to soups, sauces and stews, and mixing into your next pot of greens.

Here are just two examples of how to make preserved lemons:

Preserved Lemons: This is the classic version. Simple and effective.

Lemon Confit: Chef Eric Ripert&aposs lemon confit uses a sugar-salt mix. "I add lemon confit to so many dishes𠅏rom broiled fish to pork and beans," he says. He blends his lemon confit with butter to add a pleasantly pungent flavor to a broiled snapper. Before broiling, he dots some of the lemon butter on the fish, then serves more lemon butter on the side.

Once you&aposve mastered the preserved lemons, here are a few suggestions for what to do with them:

Broccoli with Preserved Lemon Yogurt: We loved this recipe so much we put it on the cover of the magazine! Of course the broccoli is fantastic, but it’s the yogurt sauce flavored with preserved lemon that’s the star. Once you make it, you’ll want to eat it on everything, from grilled bread and eggplant and okra, to shrimp or chicken kebabs, to lamb meatballs and baked white and sweet potatoes or squash.

Roasted Peppers with Preserved Lemon and Capers: In this typical Middle Eastern dish, preserved lemon offsets the sweetness of the peppers and adds an exotic dimension to the simply cooked vegetables.

Pan-Seared Cod with Preserved Lemon Aioli: Obviously lemon and fish go together like peanut butter and jelly, but the best takeaway from this recipe and the following one, besides the perfect fish cooking technique, are the super versatile sauces—the preserved lemon aioli that will up your sandwich game immensely and become your go-to mayo.

Trout with Preserved Lemon Vinaigrette: This quick dish from chef Viet Pham features trout fillets in a bright and tangy vinaigrette—which will quickly become the dressing for all of your grain and green salads this season.

Couscous with Red Lentils and Easy Preserved Lemons: If you’ve only got 20 minutes, this clever almost-instant take on preserved lemons is definitely worth a shot. It’s not traditional by any means, but it’s the perfect gateway to the real thing.


How to Make Preserved Lemons&mdashand What to Do With Them Once You Do

Until recently, preserved lemons turned up mostly in Moroccan tagines and other North Africans stews, as well as some Middle Eastern dishes. But they’re definitely migrating to take their place in a well-stocked multi-ethnic home pantry. The jarred versions𠅊nd there are definitely some good ones out there𠅊re often so long preserved that their flavor becomes a bit acrid, intensely bitter and rocketfuel-esque. So if you’re at all a lemonhead, you’ll definitely want to start making your own.

At its most traditional, this means cutting whole lemons, rubbing them all over with coarse salt, and then packing them in a jar with salt and lemon juice to cover. You leave them at room temperature for 4 or 5 weeks to ferment, and then you can refrigerate them until you use them up. Another bonus of making your own preserved lemons is that the pulp, which so many recipes tell you to scrape out and discard, is actually fantastic for muddling into cocktails, pureeing into dips, adding to soups, sauces and stews, and mixing into your next pot of greens.

Here are just two examples of how to make preserved lemons:

Preserved Lemons: This is the classic version. Simple and effective.

Lemon Confit: Chef Eric Ripert&aposs lemon confit uses a sugar-salt mix. "I add lemon confit to so many dishes𠅏rom broiled fish to pork and beans," he says. He blends his lemon confit with butter to add a pleasantly pungent flavor to a broiled snapper. Before broiling, he dots some of the lemon butter on the fish, then serves more lemon butter on the side.

Once you&aposve mastered the preserved lemons, here are a few suggestions for what to do with them:

Broccoli with Preserved Lemon Yogurt: We loved this recipe so much we put it on the cover of the magazine! Of course the broccoli is fantastic, but it’s the yogurt sauce flavored with preserved lemon that’s the star. Once you make it, you’ll want to eat it on everything, from grilled bread and eggplant and okra, to shrimp or chicken kebabs, to lamb meatballs and baked white and sweet potatoes or squash.

Roasted Peppers with Preserved Lemon and Capers: In this typical Middle Eastern dish, preserved lemon offsets the sweetness of the peppers and adds an exotic dimension to the simply cooked vegetables.

Pan-Seared Cod with Preserved Lemon Aioli: Obviously lemon and fish go together like peanut butter and jelly, but the best takeaway from this recipe and the following one, besides the perfect fish cooking technique, are the super versatile sauces—the preserved lemon aioli that will up your sandwich game immensely and become your go-to mayo.

Trout with Preserved Lemon Vinaigrette: This quick dish from chef Viet Pham features trout fillets in a bright and tangy vinaigrette—which will quickly become the dressing for all of your grain and green salads this season.

Couscous with Red Lentils and Easy Preserved Lemons: If you’ve only got 20 minutes, this clever almost-instant take on preserved lemons is definitely worth a shot. It’s not traditional by any means, but it’s the perfect gateway to the real thing.


How to Make Preserved Lemons&mdashand What to Do With Them Once You Do

Until recently, preserved lemons turned up mostly in Moroccan tagines and other North Africans stews, as well as some Middle Eastern dishes. But they’re definitely migrating to take their place in a well-stocked multi-ethnic home pantry. The jarred versions𠅊nd there are definitely some good ones out there𠅊re often so long preserved that their flavor becomes a bit acrid, intensely bitter and rocketfuel-esque. So if you’re at all a lemonhead, you’ll definitely want to start making your own.

At its most traditional, this means cutting whole lemons, rubbing them all over with coarse salt, and then packing them in a jar with salt and lemon juice to cover. You leave them at room temperature for 4 or 5 weeks to ferment, and then you can refrigerate them until you use them up. Another bonus of making your own preserved lemons is that the pulp, which so many recipes tell you to scrape out and discard, is actually fantastic for muddling into cocktails, pureeing into dips, adding to soups, sauces and stews, and mixing into your next pot of greens.

Here are just two examples of how to make preserved lemons:

Preserved Lemons: This is the classic version. Simple and effective.

Lemon Confit: Chef Eric Ripert&aposs lemon confit uses a sugar-salt mix. "I add lemon confit to so many dishes𠅏rom broiled fish to pork and beans," he says. He blends his lemon confit with butter to add a pleasantly pungent flavor to a broiled snapper. Before broiling, he dots some of the lemon butter on the fish, then serves more lemon butter on the side.

Once you&aposve mastered the preserved lemons, here are a few suggestions for what to do with them:

Broccoli with Preserved Lemon Yogurt: We loved this recipe so much we put it on the cover of the magazine! Of course the broccoli is fantastic, but it’s the yogurt sauce flavored with preserved lemon that’s the star. Once you make it, you’ll want to eat it on everything, from grilled bread and eggplant and okra, to shrimp or chicken kebabs, to lamb meatballs and baked white and sweet potatoes or squash.

Roasted Peppers with Preserved Lemon and Capers: In this typical Middle Eastern dish, preserved lemon offsets the sweetness of the peppers and adds an exotic dimension to the simply cooked vegetables.

Pan-Seared Cod with Preserved Lemon Aioli: Obviously lemon and fish go together like peanut butter and jelly, but the best takeaway from this recipe and the following one, besides the perfect fish cooking technique, are the super versatile sauces—the preserved lemon aioli that will up your sandwich game immensely and become your go-to mayo.

Trout with Preserved Lemon Vinaigrette: This quick dish from chef Viet Pham features trout fillets in a bright and tangy vinaigrette—which will quickly become the dressing for all of your grain and green salads this season.

Couscous with Red Lentils and Easy Preserved Lemons: If you’ve only got 20 minutes, this clever almost-instant take on preserved lemons is definitely worth a shot. It’s not traditional by any means, but it’s the perfect gateway to the real thing.


How to Make Preserved Lemons&mdashand What to Do With Them Once You Do

Until recently, preserved lemons turned up mostly in Moroccan tagines and other North Africans stews, as well as some Middle Eastern dishes. But they’re definitely migrating to take their place in a well-stocked multi-ethnic home pantry. The jarred versions𠅊nd there are definitely some good ones out there𠅊re often so long preserved that their flavor becomes a bit acrid, intensely bitter and rocketfuel-esque. So if you’re at all a lemonhead, you’ll definitely want to start making your own.

At its most traditional, this means cutting whole lemons, rubbing them all over with coarse salt, and then packing them in a jar with salt and lemon juice to cover. You leave them at room temperature for 4 or 5 weeks to ferment, and then you can refrigerate them until you use them up. Another bonus of making your own preserved lemons is that the pulp, which so many recipes tell you to scrape out and discard, is actually fantastic for muddling into cocktails, pureeing into dips, adding to soups, sauces and stews, and mixing into your next pot of greens.

Here are just two examples of how to make preserved lemons:

Preserved Lemons: This is the classic version. Simple and effective.

Lemon Confit: Chef Eric Ripert&aposs lemon confit uses a sugar-salt mix. "I add lemon confit to so many dishes𠅏rom broiled fish to pork and beans," he says. He blends his lemon confit with butter to add a pleasantly pungent flavor to a broiled snapper. Before broiling, he dots some of the lemon butter on the fish, then serves more lemon butter on the side.

Once you&aposve mastered the preserved lemons, here are a few suggestions for what to do with them:

Broccoli with Preserved Lemon Yogurt: We loved this recipe so much we put it on the cover of the magazine! Of course the broccoli is fantastic, but it’s the yogurt sauce flavored with preserved lemon that’s the star. Once you make it, you’ll want to eat it on everything, from grilled bread and eggplant and okra, to shrimp or chicken kebabs, to lamb meatballs and baked white and sweet potatoes or squash.

Roasted Peppers with Preserved Lemon and Capers: In this typical Middle Eastern dish, preserved lemon offsets the sweetness of the peppers and adds an exotic dimension to the simply cooked vegetables.

Pan-Seared Cod with Preserved Lemon Aioli: Obviously lemon and fish go together like peanut butter and jelly, but the best takeaway from this recipe and the following one, besides the perfect fish cooking technique, are the super versatile sauces—the preserved lemon aioli that will up your sandwich game immensely and become your go-to mayo.

Trout with Preserved Lemon Vinaigrette: This quick dish from chef Viet Pham features trout fillets in a bright and tangy vinaigrette—which will quickly become the dressing for all of your grain and green salads this season.

Couscous with Red Lentils and Easy Preserved Lemons: If you’ve only got 20 minutes, this clever almost-instant take on preserved lemons is definitely worth a shot. It’s not traditional by any means, but it’s the perfect gateway to the real thing.


How to Make Preserved Lemons&mdashand What to Do With Them Once You Do

Until recently, preserved lemons turned up mostly in Moroccan tagines and other North Africans stews, as well as some Middle Eastern dishes. But they’re definitely migrating to take their place in a well-stocked multi-ethnic home pantry. The jarred versions𠅊nd there are definitely some good ones out there𠅊re often so long preserved that their flavor becomes a bit acrid, intensely bitter and rocketfuel-esque. So if you’re at all a lemonhead, you’ll definitely want to start making your own.

At its most traditional, this means cutting whole lemons, rubbing them all over with coarse salt, and then packing them in a jar with salt and lemon juice to cover. You leave them at room temperature for 4 or 5 weeks to ferment, and then you can refrigerate them until you use them up. Another bonus of making your own preserved lemons is that the pulp, which so many recipes tell you to scrape out and discard, is actually fantastic for muddling into cocktails, pureeing into dips, adding to soups, sauces and stews, and mixing into your next pot of greens.

Here are just two examples of how to make preserved lemons:

Preserved Lemons: This is the classic version. Simple and effective.

Lemon Confit: Chef Eric Ripert&aposs lemon confit uses a sugar-salt mix. "I add lemon confit to so many dishes𠅏rom broiled fish to pork and beans," he says. He blends his lemon confit with butter to add a pleasantly pungent flavor to a broiled snapper. Before broiling, he dots some of the lemon butter on the fish, then serves more lemon butter on the side.

Once you&aposve mastered the preserved lemons, here are a few suggestions for what to do with them:

Broccoli with Preserved Lemon Yogurt: We loved this recipe so much we put it on the cover of the magazine! Of course the broccoli is fantastic, but it’s the yogurt sauce flavored with preserved lemon that’s the star. Once you make it, you’ll want to eat it on everything, from grilled bread and eggplant and okra, to shrimp or chicken kebabs, to lamb meatballs and baked white and sweet potatoes or squash.

Roasted Peppers with Preserved Lemon and Capers: In this typical Middle Eastern dish, preserved lemon offsets the sweetness of the peppers and adds an exotic dimension to the simply cooked vegetables.

Pan-Seared Cod with Preserved Lemon Aioli: Obviously lemon and fish go together like peanut butter and jelly, but the best takeaway from this recipe and the following one, besides the perfect fish cooking technique, are the super versatile sauces—the preserved lemon aioli that will up your sandwich game immensely and become your go-to mayo.

Trout with Preserved Lemon Vinaigrette: This quick dish from chef Viet Pham features trout fillets in a bright and tangy vinaigrette—which will quickly become the dressing for all of your grain and green salads this season.

Couscous with Red Lentils and Easy Preserved Lemons: If you’ve only got 20 minutes, this clever almost-instant take on preserved lemons is definitely worth a shot. It’s not traditional by any means, but it’s the perfect gateway to the real thing.


How to Make Preserved Lemons&mdashand What to Do With Them Once You Do

Until recently, preserved lemons turned up mostly in Moroccan tagines and other North Africans stews, as well as some Middle Eastern dishes. But they’re definitely migrating to take their place in a well-stocked multi-ethnic home pantry. The jarred versions𠅊nd there are definitely some good ones out there𠅊re often so long preserved that their flavor becomes a bit acrid, intensely bitter and rocketfuel-esque. So if you’re at all a lemonhead, you’ll definitely want to start making your own.

At its most traditional, this means cutting whole lemons, rubbing them all over with coarse salt, and then packing them in a jar with salt and lemon juice to cover. You leave them at room temperature for 4 or 5 weeks to ferment, and then you can refrigerate them until you use them up. Another bonus of making your own preserved lemons is that the pulp, which so many recipes tell you to scrape out and discard, is actually fantastic for muddling into cocktails, pureeing into dips, adding to soups, sauces and stews, and mixing into your next pot of greens.

Here are just two examples of how to make preserved lemons:

Preserved Lemons: This is the classic version. Simple and effective.

Lemon Confit: Chef Eric Ripert&aposs lemon confit uses a sugar-salt mix. "I add lemon confit to so many dishes𠅏rom broiled fish to pork and beans," he says. He blends his lemon confit with butter to add a pleasantly pungent flavor to a broiled snapper. Before broiling, he dots some of the lemon butter on the fish, then serves more lemon butter on the side.

Once you&aposve mastered the preserved lemons, here are a few suggestions for what to do with them:

Broccoli with Preserved Lemon Yogurt: We loved this recipe so much we put it on the cover of the magazine! Of course the broccoli is fantastic, but it’s the yogurt sauce flavored with preserved lemon that’s the star. Once you make it, you’ll want to eat it on everything, from grilled bread and eggplant and okra, to shrimp or chicken kebabs, to lamb meatballs and baked white and sweet potatoes or squash.

Roasted Peppers with Preserved Lemon and Capers: In this typical Middle Eastern dish, preserved lemon offsets the sweetness of the peppers and adds an exotic dimension to the simply cooked vegetables.

Pan-Seared Cod with Preserved Lemon Aioli: Obviously lemon and fish go together like peanut butter and jelly, but the best takeaway from this recipe and the following one, besides the perfect fish cooking technique, are the super versatile sauces—the preserved lemon aioli that will up your sandwich game immensely and become your go-to mayo.

Trout with Preserved Lemon Vinaigrette: This quick dish from chef Viet Pham features trout fillets in a bright and tangy vinaigrette—which will quickly become the dressing for all of your grain and green salads this season.

Couscous with Red Lentils and Easy Preserved Lemons: If you’ve only got 20 minutes, this clever almost-instant take on preserved lemons is definitely worth a shot. It’s not traditional by any means, but it’s the perfect gateway to the real thing.


How to Make Preserved Lemons&mdashand What to Do With Them Once You Do

Until recently, preserved lemons turned up mostly in Moroccan tagines and other North Africans stews, as well as some Middle Eastern dishes. But they’re definitely migrating to take their place in a well-stocked multi-ethnic home pantry. The jarred versions𠅊nd there are definitely some good ones out there𠅊re often so long preserved that their flavor becomes a bit acrid, intensely bitter and rocketfuel-esque. So if you’re at all a lemonhead, you’ll definitely want to start making your own.

At its most traditional, this means cutting whole lemons, rubbing them all over with coarse salt, and then packing them in a jar with salt and lemon juice to cover. You leave them at room temperature for 4 or 5 weeks to ferment, and then you can refrigerate them until you use them up. Another bonus of making your own preserved lemons is that the pulp, which so many recipes tell you to scrape out and discard, is actually fantastic for muddling into cocktails, pureeing into dips, adding to soups, sauces and stews, and mixing into your next pot of greens.

Here are just two examples of how to make preserved lemons:

Preserved Lemons: This is the classic version. Simple and effective.

Lemon Confit: Chef Eric Ripert&aposs lemon confit uses a sugar-salt mix. "I add lemon confit to so many dishes𠅏rom broiled fish to pork and beans," he says. He blends his lemon confit with butter to add a pleasantly pungent flavor to a broiled snapper. Before broiling, he dots some of the lemon butter on the fish, then serves more lemon butter on the side.

Once you&aposve mastered the preserved lemons, here are a few suggestions for what to do with them:

Broccoli with Preserved Lemon Yogurt: We loved this recipe so much we put it on the cover of the magazine! Of course the broccoli is fantastic, but it’s the yogurt sauce flavored with preserved lemon that’s the star. Once you make it, you’ll want to eat it on everything, from grilled bread and eggplant and okra, to shrimp or chicken kebabs, to lamb meatballs and baked white and sweet potatoes or squash.

Roasted Peppers with Preserved Lemon and Capers: In this typical Middle Eastern dish, preserved lemon offsets the sweetness of the peppers and adds an exotic dimension to the simply cooked vegetables.

Pan-Seared Cod with Preserved Lemon Aioli: Obviously lemon and fish go together like peanut butter and jelly, but the best takeaway from this recipe and the following one, besides the perfect fish cooking technique, are the super versatile sauces—the preserved lemon aioli that will up your sandwich game immensely and become your go-to mayo.

Trout with Preserved Lemon Vinaigrette: This quick dish from chef Viet Pham features trout fillets in a bright and tangy vinaigrette—which will quickly become the dressing for all of your grain and green salads this season.

Couscous with Red Lentils and Easy Preserved Lemons: If you’ve only got 20 minutes, this clever almost-instant take on preserved lemons is definitely worth a shot. It’s not traditional by any means, but it’s the perfect gateway to the real thing.


How to Make Preserved Lemons&mdashand What to Do With Them Once You Do

Until recently, preserved lemons turned up mostly in Moroccan tagines and other North Africans stews, as well as some Middle Eastern dishes. But they’re definitely migrating to take their place in a well-stocked multi-ethnic home pantry. The jarred versions𠅊nd there are definitely some good ones out there𠅊re often so long preserved that their flavor becomes a bit acrid, intensely bitter and rocketfuel-esque. So if you’re at all a lemonhead, you’ll definitely want to start making your own.

At its most traditional, this means cutting whole lemons, rubbing them all over with coarse salt, and then packing them in a jar with salt and lemon juice to cover. You leave them at room temperature for 4 or 5 weeks to ferment, and then you can refrigerate them until you use them up. Another bonus of making your own preserved lemons is that the pulp, which so many recipes tell you to scrape out and discard, is actually fantastic for muddling into cocktails, pureeing into dips, adding to soups, sauces and stews, and mixing into your next pot of greens.

Here are just two examples of how to make preserved lemons:

Preserved Lemons: This is the classic version. Simple and effective.

Lemon Confit: Chef Eric Ripert&aposs lemon confit uses a sugar-salt mix. "I add lemon confit to so many dishes𠅏rom broiled fish to pork and beans," he says. He blends his lemon confit with butter to add a pleasantly pungent flavor to a broiled snapper. Before broiling, he dots some of the lemon butter on the fish, then serves more lemon butter on the side.

Once you&aposve mastered the preserved lemons, here are a few suggestions for what to do with them:

Broccoli with Preserved Lemon Yogurt: We loved this recipe so much we put it on the cover of the magazine! Of course the broccoli is fantastic, but it’s the yogurt sauce flavored with preserved lemon that’s the star. Once you make it, you’ll want to eat it on everything, from grilled bread and eggplant and okra, to shrimp or chicken kebabs, to lamb meatballs and baked white and sweet potatoes or squash.

Roasted Peppers with Preserved Lemon and Capers: In this typical Middle Eastern dish, preserved lemon offsets the sweetness of the peppers and adds an exotic dimension to the simply cooked vegetables.

Pan-Seared Cod with Preserved Lemon Aioli: Obviously lemon and fish go together like peanut butter and jelly, but the best takeaway from this recipe and the following one, besides the perfect fish cooking technique, are the super versatile sauces—the preserved lemon aioli that will up your sandwich game immensely and become your go-to mayo.

Trout with Preserved Lemon Vinaigrette: This quick dish from chef Viet Pham features trout fillets in a bright and tangy vinaigrette—which will quickly become the dressing for all of your grain and green salads this season.

Couscous with Red Lentils and Easy Preserved Lemons: If you’ve only got 20 minutes, this clever almost-instant take on preserved lemons is definitely worth a shot. It’s not traditional by any means, but it’s the perfect gateway to the real thing.


How to Make Preserved Lemons&mdashand What to Do With Them Once You Do

Until recently, preserved lemons turned up mostly in Moroccan tagines and other North Africans stews, as well as some Middle Eastern dishes. But they’re definitely migrating to take their place in a well-stocked multi-ethnic home pantry. The jarred versions𠅊nd there are definitely some good ones out there𠅊re often so long preserved that their flavor becomes a bit acrid, intensely bitter and rocketfuel-esque. So if you’re at all a lemonhead, you’ll definitely want to start making your own.

At its most traditional, this means cutting whole lemons, rubbing them all over with coarse salt, and then packing them in a jar with salt and lemon juice to cover. You leave them at room temperature for 4 or 5 weeks to ferment, and then you can refrigerate them until you use them up. Another bonus of making your own preserved lemons is that the pulp, which so many recipes tell you to scrape out and discard, is actually fantastic for muddling into cocktails, pureeing into dips, adding to soups, sauces and stews, and mixing into your next pot of greens.

Here are just two examples of how to make preserved lemons:

Preserved Lemons: This is the classic version. Simple and effective.

Lemon Confit: Chef Eric Ripert&aposs lemon confit uses a sugar-salt mix. "I add lemon confit to so many dishes𠅏rom broiled fish to pork and beans," he says. He blends his lemon confit with butter to add a pleasantly pungent flavor to a broiled snapper. Before broiling, he dots some of the lemon butter on the fish, then serves more lemon butter on the side.

Once you&aposve mastered the preserved lemons, here are a few suggestions for what to do with them:

Broccoli with Preserved Lemon Yogurt: We loved this recipe so much we put it on the cover of the magazine! Of course the broccoli is fantastic, but it’s the yogurt sauce flavored with preserved lemon that’s the star. Once you make it, you’ll want to eat it on everything, from grilled bread and eggplant and okra, to shrimp or chicken kebabs, to lamb meatballs and baked white and sweet potatoes or squash.

Roasted Peppers with Preserved Lemon and Capers: In this typical Middle Eastern dish, preserved lemon offsets the sweetness of the peppers and adds an exotic dimension to the simply cooked vegetables.

Pan-Seared Cod with Preserved Lemon Aioli: Obviously lemon and fish go together like peanut butter and jelly, but the best takeaway from this recipe and the following one, besides the perfect fish cooking technique, are the super versatile sauces—the preserved lemon aioli that will up your sandwich game immensely and become your go-to mayo.

Trout with Preserved Lemon Vinaigrette: This quick dish from chef Viet Pham features trout fillets in a bright and tangy vinaigrette—which will quickly become the dressing for all of your grain and green salads this season.

Couscous with Red Lentils and Easy Preserved Lemons: If you’ve only got 20 minutes, this clever almost-instant take on preserved lemons is definitely worth a shot. It’s not traditional by any means, but it’s the perfect gateway to the real thing.