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101 Best Restaurants in Asia 2013

101 Best Restaurants in Asia 2013



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First came The Daily Meal's 101 Best Restaurants in America, then 101 Best Hotel Restaurants Around the World and 101 Best Restaurants in Europe. Now, The Daily Meal continues its culinary tour of the world with its first-ever roster of the 101 Best Restaurants in Asia.

See 101 Best Restaurants in Asia 2013 Slideshow

It would have been easy to name 101 excellent restaurants in China alone, or in Japan, or Hong Kong, but we wanted to represent as wide a geographical area as possible, discovering lesser-known gems in other corners of Asia as well as recognizing the best establishments in more familiar places. Thus, our list includes restaurants in 11 countries — Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam — plus Hong Kong and Macau. China has the most entries, 28 in all.

We offer choices in 25 cities — not just capitals like Beijing, Seoul, Taipei, and Tokyo, but smaller municipalities, too, among them Danang (Vietnam), Unawatuna (Sri Lanka), and Bintan (Indonesia). We've included plenty of showplace dining rooms in grand hotels, but also places in unlikely locales, like two in Tokyo: Sushi Saito, a seven-seater in a parking garage, and Sukiyabashi Jiro, a celebrated 10-seat sushi bar down in the subway.

In choosing our 101 best, we called upon more than 50 experts who either live in Asia or spend time there frequently — restaurant critics, food and lifestyle writers, and bloggers with wide restaurant-going experience — supplemented by The Daily Meal’s well-traveled editorial staff, and asked them to help nominate a short list of 202 places, then evaluate the selection and vote for their favorites, country by country (meet The Daily Meal's panelists).

We further asked our panelists to vote by region in four categories: Cuisine, Style/Décor/Service, Value, and Don't Miss. From innovative menu options to plating and presentation to freshness, quality, and taste, panelists evaluated each restaurant’s cuisine and voted only for the restaurants which they believe to be extraordinary, whether showplaces for avant-garde culinary techniques or simple venues specializing in noodles or dumplings. They also rated the overall dining experience, from the restaurant’s interior design and dining room ambiance to the skill and efficiency of the service. In the Value category, panelists selected the restaurants that offer the best meals in each price category, defined as the price per person for a meal, food only: budget ($25 or less); moderate (between $25 and $100 — and yes, by Asian standards, that counts as moderate); and pricey but worth it for a splurge ($100 or more). Finally, we asked this question: What restaurant or restaurants should a visitor to each city in our survey absolutely not miss — which, that is, are essential to the culinary identity of each place?

Every restaurant, then, had the chance to be voted on up to four times in the survey. The percentage scores from each category were weighted. With 50 percent, the greatest weight was assigned to our "Cuisine" category. Our "Value" and "Style/Décor/Service" categories had equal weight with 19 percent each, and the remaining weight, or 12 percent, was assigned to "Don't Miss."

We considered restaurants offering the cuisines of their own regions, of course, but also those that serve the food from other parts of Asia (we found excellent Thai food at Baan Aarya in Indonesia, for instance, and excellent sushi at Sushi Oyama in Shanghai). And of course, we included a number of the great restaurants offering classic French, authentic Italian, imaginative East-West fusion, and other cuisines of the world. We did not discriminate according to location; no town, island, or enclave was off the table (see the entire 101 Best Restaurants in Asia list).

Slideshow: 101 Best Restaurants in Asia 2013 Slideshow

Four restaurants from The Daily Meal’s inaugural 101 Best Hotel Restaurants Around the World are also honored here, including three in Hong Kong — Felix at The Peninsula Hotel, Lung King Heen at the Four Seasons, and Man Wah at the Mandarin Oriental — along with Orient Express at the Taj Palace Hotel in New Delhi.

The dining options in Asia today are seemingly endless, from street carts to night markets to cosmopolitan cafés to the domains of European and American celebrity chefs. This has by no means always been true. Sushi bars, for instance, barely existed before the 1920s, and really became ubiquitous around Japan — and then around the rest of Asia and the world — only after refrigerated shipping became common in the last third of the 20th century, allowing fresh fish of sushi quality to be sold almost everywhere.

In most Asian countries, in fact, there isn't a long tradition of restaurants in the modern Western sense — which, among other things, helps explain why there are so many European or fusion places on our list. Another factor, though, has been the rise of the so-called Four Asian Tigers — Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan — whose economies skyrocketed in the latter half of the 20th century, and the increasing Westernization (and accumulation of private wealth) in China, all of which helped create a customer base for restaurants offering sophisticated French or Italian dining. At the same time, provincial, often humble mom-and-pop places remain the norm in vast parts of Asia, and continue to provide some of the best food and most authentic flavors of their regions.

Arguably the most dramatically changed culinary landscape is that of China, which has the most restaurants on the list with 28, 21 of which are in Beijing. As the country opened up after 1989, chefs began to arrive from other countries, eager to serve the people in this vast new marketplace. The 2008 Beijing Olympic Games only stimulated culinary creativity, and soon a who’s who of culinary luminaries, like Daniel Boulud and Joël Robuchon, were setting up shop in Beijing, Shanghai, and beyond. Today, it is possible to find not only great Chinese food in the country but also first-rate sushi and Thai and Vietnamese food, as well as representations of French, Italian, Spanish, and other European cuisines that are as good as anything anywhere in the world.

Any list like this one is bound to stir disagreements among discerning diners; even our own staff was divided on which restaurants should make the final cut.

After checking out The Daily Meal’s 101 Best Restaurants in Asia, share your compliments and critiques in the comments section below — or on Twitter using the hashtag #bestrestaurants — and let us know what places you think should have been included, or should have been left out.

Lauren Mack, former Travel editor and Special Projects editor at The Daily Meal, lived and dined in Beijing and Taiwan for more than six years. Follow her on Twitter @lmack.

Travel editor Lauren Wilson (@ariellauren), editorial director Colman Andrews (@Colmanandrews), executive editor Arthur Bovino (@Arthur_Bovino), and The Daily Meal editorial staff contributed to 101 Best Restaurants in Asia.

#101 Baan Aarya (Bintan, Indonesia)

#100 Kitcho Arashiyama (Kyoto, Japan)

#99 Karaiya (Beijing)

#98 Jia 21 Hao (Beijing)

#97 Agua (Hong Kong)

#96 Bao Yuan (Beijing)

#95 Mandarin (Ho Chi Minh City)

#94 Sirocco (Bangkok, Thailand)

#93 Long Beach Seafood Restaurant (Singapore)

#92 Three Guizhou Men (Beijing)

#91 Friends the Restaurant (Phnom Penh, Cambodia)

#90 Hutong (Hong Kong)

#89 Man Fu Lou (Beijing)

#88 Petrus (Hong Kong)

#87 My Humble House (Beijing)

#86 Hiroshima (Taipei, Taiwan)

#85 Jing'An Restaurant (Shanghai)

#84 Ramen Santouka (Hokkaido, Japan)

#83 Don Alfonso 1890 (Macau)

#82 The Chairman (Hong Kong)

#81 The Courtyard by Brian McKenna (Beijing)

#80 Hajime (Osaka, Japan)

#79 Garuda Padang Cuisine (Jakarta, Indonesia)

#78 Camões (Macau)

#77 Sushi Mizutani (Tokyo)

#76 La Cocotte (Taipei, Taiwan)

#75 Restaurant Guy Savoy (Singapore)

#74 Seventy-two Beef Noodle Restaurant (Taipei, Taiwan)

#73 Iggy's (Singapore)

#72 Hatsune (Beijing)

#71 Hoi An (Ho Chi Minh City)

#70 Osteria de Angie (Taipei, Taiwan)

#69 Nihonryori Ryugin (Tokyo)

#68 Felix (Hong Kong)

#67 Transit (Beijing)

#66 Bo.lan (Bangkok, Thailand)

#65 Sawada (Tokyo)

#64 Mozaic (Bali, Indonesia)

#63 Nicholini's (Hong Kong)

#62 Ishikawa (Tokyo)

#61 Goga (Shanghai)

#60 Quintessence (Tokyo)

#59 Ultraviolet by Paul Pairet (Shanghai)

#58 La Maison 1888 (Danang, Vietnam)

#57 The Drawing Room (Hong Kong)

#56 Liqun Roast Duck (Beijing)

#55 Orient Express (New Delhi, India)

#54 Farmer’s Original Handmade Hamburger (Busan, South Korea)

#53 Cépage (Hong Kong)

#52 Sushi Oyama (Shanghai)

#51 Yat Lok Restaurant (Hong Kong)

#50 Nonzero (Taipei, Taiwan)

#49 Noodle Loft (Beijing)

#48 Koju (Tokyo)

#47 Ojangdong Hamheong Nengmyeon (Seoul, South Korea)

#46 CUT Singapore (Singapore)

#45 Yung Kee (Hong Kong)

#44 Alameda (Beijing)

#43 Tu Hsiao Yueh (Taipei, Taiwan)

#42 Sushi Saito (Tokyo)

#41 Man Wah (Hong Kong)

#40 Southern Barbarian (Beijing)

#39 L'Atelier de Joël Robuchon (Hong Kong)

#38 Jean Georges (Shanghai)

#37 Soul Food Mahanakorn (Bangkok, Thailand)

#36 Baekdu (Busan, South Korea)

#35 Maxim's (Hong Kong)

#34 Amber (Hong Kong)

#33 Kikunoi Honten (Kyoto, Japan)

#32 Indigo (Mumbai, India)

#31 Tim Ho Wan (Hong Kong)

#30 The Byeokje Galbi (Seoul, South Korea)

#29 Fat Sui Lao (Macau)

#28 Nha hang Ngon (Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam)

#27 Flutes At The Fort (Singapore)

#26 Mr & Mrs Bund (Shanghai)

#25 Kingfisher (Unawatuna, Sri Lanka)

#24 Bukhara (New Delhi, India)

#23 Takazawa (Tokyo)

#22 Endo Sushi (Osaka, Japan)

#21 Lemongrass (Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam)

#20 Le Musée (Sapporo, Japan)

#19 Nahm (Bangkok, Thailand)

#18 Caprice (Hong Kong)

#17 Karavalli (Bangalore, India)

#16 Bellagio (Beijing)

#15 Sukiyabashi Jiro (Tokyo)

#14 Da Dong (Beijing)

#13 Susu (Beijing)

#12 M on the Bund (Shanghai)

#11 Restaurante Fernando (Macau)

#10 8 ½ Otto e Mezzo BOMBANA (Hong Kong)

#9 Michel Bras TOYA Japon (Toyako, Japan)

#8 Lung King Heen (Hong Kong)

#7 Dali Courtyard (Beijing)

#6 Varq (New Delhi, India)

#5 Capital M (Beijing)

#4 Temple Restaurant (Beijing)

#3 Green T. House (Beijing)

#2 Duck de Chine (Beijing)

#1 Din Tai Fung (Taipei, Taiwan)


Asia’s Best Female Chef 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas

Despite a global pandemic, 2020 was chef DeAille Tam’s year. After embarking on a year-long culinary research trip across China with her life partner and co-chef Simon Wong, in November 2020 she achieved her dream of opening her own restaurant: Obscura in Shanghai. Now, her progressive approach to gastronomy, deep understanding of China’s culinary traditions and leadership in the kitchen and beyond have seen her recognised with the Asia’s Best Female Chef Award 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas.

Born in Hong Kong, Tam was living in Canada and studying for an engineering career when she discovered a passion for cooking. Defying societal expectations of what occupation a Chinese woman should aspire to hold, she followed her instincts and enrolled in the culinary program at George Brown College in Toronto, eventually earning a post-graduate degree in Italian cuisine.

Tam met Wong while studying, and the two trained in Toronto’s kitchens before returning to their native Hong Kong in 2014, where they joined seminal restaurant Bo Innovation. Working with chef Alvin Leung, acclaimed for his bold interpretations of the eight Chinese regional cuisines, the couple rose to be co-head chefs and led the opening of Bo Shanghai in 2016. When the restaurant was awarded a Michelin star in 2017, Tam became the first female chef in Mainland China to hold the honour.

In 2020, having witnessed the turmoil caused by the coronavirus pandemic on the gastronomic industry, Tam and Wong decided to create their own restaurant, where they would bet on their personal interpretation of innovative Chinese cuisine. Obscura, set within the three-storey Tang Xiang Cultural Space, melds the couple’s studies in their country’s rich culinary traditions with an international outlook on ingredients and techniques.

While travelling through China in 2019, Tam came across chen pi, a traditional preparation that sees mandarin peels dried and aged – sometimes for decades – for enhanced flavour. At Obscura, she was inspired to apply the technique to classical French recipe, duck à l’orange. In Tam’s version, the duck is confited and seasoned with a mandarin peel powder and sauce. The dish is completed with duck foie gras, candied and poached mandarin flesh, dehydrated carrot chips and chestnut purée.

The creation represents Tam’s outstanding ability to draw inspiration from China’s millennia-old culinary heritage while seamlessly integrating western inspiration and techniques. Having overcome many difficulties and stereotypes as a young female chef in China, Tam is ready to be a role model for the new generation of cooks and to continue building a promising future for Chinese cuisine.

To discover more, read the interview with DeAille Tam on 50 Best Stories and watch the video:

Contact

Obscura, No. 2, Lane 538 Xikang Lu, near Kangding Lu, Jing'an District, Shanghai, China


Asia’s Best Female Chef 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas

Despite a global pandemic, 2020 was chef DeAille Tam’s year. After embarking on a year-long culinary research trip across China with her life partner and co-chef Simon Wong, in November 2020 she achieved her dream of opening her own restaurant: Obscura in Shanghai. Now, her progressive approach to gastronomy, deep understanding of China’s culinary traditions and leadership in the kitchen and beyond have seen her recognised with the Asia’s Best Female Chef Award 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas.

Born in Hong Kong, Tam was living in Canada and studying for an engineering career when she discovered a passion for cooking. Defying societal expectations of what occupation a Chinese woman should aspire to hold, she followed her instincts and enrolled in the culinary program at George Brown College in Toronto, eventually earning a post-graduate degree in Italian cuisine.

Tam met Wong while studying, and the two trained in Toronto’s kitchens before returning to their native Hong Kong in 2014, where they joined seminal restaurant Bo Innovation. Working with chef Alvin Leung, acclaimed for his bold interpretations of the eight Chinese regional cuisines, the couple rose to be co-head chefs and led the opening of Bo Shanghai in 2016. When the restaurant was awarded a Michelin star in 2017, Tam became the first female chef in Mainland China to hold the honour.

In 2020, having witnessed the turmoil caused by the coronavirus pandemic on the gastronomic industry, Tam and Wong decided to create their own restaurant, where they would bet on their personal interpretation of innovative Chinese cuisine. Obscura, set within the three-storey Tang Xiang Cultural Space, melds the couple’s studies in their country’s rich culinary traditions with an international outlook on ingredients and techniques.

While travelling through China in 2019, Tam came across chen pi, a traditional preparation that sees mandarin peels dried and aged – sometimes for decades – for enhanced flavour. At Obscura, she was inspired to apply the technique to classical French recipe, duck à l’orange. In Tam’s version, the duck is confited and seasoned with a mandarin peel powder and sauce. The dish is completed with duck foie gras, candied and poached mandarin flesh, dehydrated carrot chips and chestnut purée.

The creation represents Tam’s outstanding ability to draw inspiration from China’s millennia-old culinary heritage while seamlessly integrating western inspiration and techniques. Having overcome many difficulties and stereotypes as a young female chef in China, Tam is ready to be a role model for the new generation of cooks and to continue building a promising future for Chinese cuisine.

To discover more, read the interview with DeAille Tam on 50 Best Stories and watch the video:

Contact

Obscura, No. 2, Lane 538 Xikang Lu, near Kangding Lu, Jing'an District, Shanghai, China


Asia’s Best Female Chef 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas

Despite a global pandemic, 2020 was chef DeAille Tam’s year. After embarking on a year-long culinary research trip across China with her life partner and co-chef Simon Wong, in November 2020 she achieved her dream of opening her own restaurant: Obscura in Shanghai. Now, her progressive approach to gastronomy, deep understanding of China’s culinary traditions and leadership in the kitchen and beyond have seen her recognised with the Asia’s Best Female Chef Award 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas.

Born in Hong Kong, Tam was living in Canada and studying for an engineering career when she discovered a passion for cooking. Defying societal expectations of what occupation a Chinese woman should aspire to hold, she followed her instincts and enrolled in the culinary program at George Brown College in Toronto, eventually earning a post-graduate degree in Italian cuisine.

Tam met Wong while studying, and the two trained in Toronto’s kitchens before returning to their native Hong Kong in 2014, where they joined seminal restaurant Bo Innovation. Working with chef Alvin Leung, acclaimed for his bold interpretations of the eight Chinese regional cuisines, the couple rose to be co-head chefs and led the opening of Bo Shanghai in 2016. When the restaurant was awarded a Michelin star in 2017, Tam became the first female chef in Mainland China to hold the honour.

In 2020, having witnessed the turmoil caused by the coronavirus pandemic on the gastronomic industry, Tam and Wong decided to create their own restaurant, where they would bet on their personal interpretation of innovative Chinese cuisine. Obscura, set within the three-storey Tang Xiang Cultural Space, melds the couple’s studies in their country’s rich culinary traditions with an international outlook on ingredients and techniques.

While travelling through China in 2019, Tam came across chen pi, a traditional preparation that sees mandarin peels dried and aged – sometimes for decades – for enhanced flavour. At Obscura, she was inspired to apply the technique to classical French recipe, duck à l’orange. In Tam’s version, the duck is confited and seasoned with a mandarin peel powder and sauce. The dish is completed with duck foie gras, candied and poached mandarin flesh, dehydrated carrot chips and chestnut purée.

The creation represents Tam’s outstanding ability to draw inspiration from China’s millennia-old culinary heritage while seamlessly integrating western inspiration and techniques. Having overcome many difficulties and stereotypes as a young female chef in China, Tam is ready to be a role model for the new generation of cooks and to continue building a promising future for Chinese cuisine.

To discover more, read the interview with DeAille Tam on 50 Best Stories and watch the video:

Contact

Obscura, No. 2, Lane 538 Xikang Lu, near Kangding Lu, Jing'an District, Shanghai, China


Asia’s Best Female Chef 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas

Despite a global pandemic, 2020 was chef DeAille Tam’s year. After embarking on a year-long culinary research trip across China with her life partner and co-chef Simon Wong, in November 2020 she achieved her dream of opening her own restaurant: Obscura in Shanghai. Now, her progressive approach to gastronomy, deep understanding of China’s culinary traditions and leadership in the kitchen and beyond have seen her recognised with the Asia’s Best Female Chef Award 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas.

Born in Hong Kong, Tam was living in Canada and studying for an engineering career when she discovered a passion for cooking. Defying societal expectations of what occupation a Chinese woman should aspire to hold, she followed her instincts and enrolled in the culinary program at George Brown College in Toronto, eventually earning a post-graduate degree in Italian cuisine.

Tam met Wong while studying, and the two trained in Toronto’s kitchens before returning to their native Hong Kong in 2014, where they joined seminal restaurant Bo Innovation. Working with chef Alvin Leung, acclaimed for his bold interpretations of the eight Chinese regional cuisines, the couple rose to be co-head chefs and led the opening of Bo Shanghai in 2016. When the restaurant was awarded a Michelin star in 2017, Tam became the first female chef in Mainland China to hold the honour.

In 2020, having witnessed the turmoil caused by the coronavirus pandemic on the gastronomic industry, Tam and Wong decided to create their own restaurant, where they would bet on their personal interpretation of innovative Chinese cuisine. Obscura, set within the three-storey Tang Xiang Cultural Space, melds the couple’s studies in their country’s rich culinary traditions with an international outlook on ingredients and techniques.

While travelling through China in 2019, Tam came across chen pi, a traditional preparation that sees mandarin peels dried and aged – sometimes for decades – for enhanced flavour. At Obscura, she was inspired to apply the technique to classical French recipe, duck à l’orange. In Tam’s version, the duck is confited and seasoned with a mandarin peel powder and sauce. The dish is completed with duck foie gras, candied and poached mandarin flesh, dehydrated carrot chips and chestnut purée.

The creation represents Tam’s outstanding ability to draw inspiration from China’s millennia-old culinary heritage while seamlessly integrating western inspiration and techniques. Having overcome many difficulties and stereotypes as a young female chef in China, Tam is ready to be a role model for the new generation of cooks and to continue building a promising future for Chinese cuisine.

To discover more, read the interview with DeAille Tam on 50 Best Stories and watch the video:

Contact

Obscura, No. 2, Lane 538 Xikang Lu, near Kangding Lu, Jing'an District, Shanghai, China


Asia’s Best Female Chef 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas

Despite a global pandemic, 2020 was chef DeAille Tam’s year. After embarking on a year-long culinary research trip across China with her life partner and co-chef Simon Wong, in November 2020 she achieved her dream of opening her own restaurant: Obscura in Shanghai. Now, her progressive approach to gastronomy, deep understanding of China’s culinary traditions and leadership in the kitchen and beyond have seen her recognised with the Asia’s Best Female Chef Award 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas.

Born in Hong Kong, Tam was living in Canada and studying for an engineering career when she discovered a passion for cooking. Defying societal expectations of what occupation a Chinese woman should aspire to hold, she followed her instincts and enrolled in the culinary program at George Brown College in Toronto, eventually earning a post-graduate degree in Italian cuisine.

Tam met Wong while studying, and the two trained in Toronto’s kitchens before returning to their native Hong Kong in 2014, where they joined seminal restaurant Bo Innovation. Working with chef Alvin Leung, acclaimed for his bold interpretations of the eight Chinese regional cuisines, the couple rose to be co-head chefs and led the opening of Bo Shanghai in 2016. When the restaurant was awarded a Michelin star in 2017, Tam became the first female chef in Mainland China to hold the honour.

In 2020, having witnessed the turmoil caused by the coronavirus pandemic on the gastronomic industry, Tam and Wong decided to create their own restaurant, where they would bet on their personal interpretation of innovative Chinese cuisine. Obscura, set within the three-storey Tang Xiang Cultural Space, melds the couple’s studies in their country’s rich culinary traditions with an international outlook on ingredients and techniques.

While travelling through China in 2019, Tam came across chen pi, a traditional preparation that sees mandarin peels dried and aged – sometimes for decades – for enhanced flavour. At Obscura, she was inspired to apply the technique to classical French recipe, duck à l’orange. In Tam’s version, the duck is confited and seasoned with a mandarin peel powder and sauce. The dish is completed with duck foie gras, candied and poached mandarin flesh, dehydrated carrot chips and chestnut purée.

The creation represents Tam’s outstanding ability to draw inspiration from China’s millennia-old culinary heritage while seamlessly integrating western inspiration and techniques. Having overcome many difficulties and stereotypes as a young female chef in China, Tam is ready to be a role model for the new generation of cooks and to continue building a promising future for Chinese cuisine.

To discover more, read the interview with DeAille Tam on 50 Best Stories and watch the video:

Contact

Obscura, No. 2, Lane 538 Xikang Lu, near Kangding Lu, Jing'an District, Shanghai, China


Asia’s Best Female Chef 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas

Despite a global pandemic, 2020 was chef DeAille Tam’s year. After embarking on a year-long culinary research trip across China with her life partner and co-chef Simon Wong, in November 2020 she achieved her dream of opening her own restaurant: Obscura in Shanghai. Now, her progressive approach to gastronomy, deep understanding of China’s culinary traditions and leadership in the kitchen and beyond have seen her recognised with the Asia’s Best Female Chef Award 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas.

Born in Hong Kong, Tam was living in Canada and studying for an engineering career when she discovered a passion for cooking. Defying societal expectations of what occupation a Chinese woman should aspire to hold, she followed her instincts and enrolled in the culinary program at George Brown College in Toronto, eventually earning a post-graduate degree in Italian cuisine.

Tam met Wong while studying, and the two trained in Toronto’s kitchens before returning to their native Hong Kong in 2014, where they joined seminal restaurant Bo Innovation. Working with chef Alvin Leung, acclaimed for his bold interpretations of the eight Chinese regional cuisines, the couple rose to be co-head chefs and led the opening of Bo Shanghai in 2016. When the restaurant was awarded a Michelin star in 2017, Tam became the first female chef in Mainland China to hold the honour.

In 2020, having witnessed the turmoil caused by the coronavirus pandemic on the gastronomic industry, Tam and Wong decided to create their own restaurant, where they would bet on their personal interpretation of innovative Chinese cuisine. Obscura, set within the three-storey Tang Xiang Cultural Space, melds the couple’s studies in their country’s rich culinary traditions with an international outlook on ingredients and techniques.

While travelling through China in 2019, Tam came across chen pi, a traditional preparation that sees mandarin peels dried and aged – sometimes for decades – for enhanced flavour. At Obscura, she was inspired to apply the technique to classical French recipe, duck à l’orange. In Tam’s version, the duck is confited and seasoned with a mandarin peel powder and sauce. The dish is completed with duck foie gras, candied and poached mandarin flesh, dehydrated carrot chips and chestnut purée.

The creation represents Tam’s outstanding ability to draw inspiration from China’s millennia-old culinary heritage while seamlessly integrating western inspiration and techniques. Having overcome many difficulties and stereotypes as a young female chef in China, Tam is ready to be a role model for the new generation of cooks and to continue building a promising future for Chinese cuisine.

To discover more, read the interview with DeAille Tam on 50 Best Stories and watch the video:

Contact

Obscura, No. 2, Lane 538 Xikang Lu, near Kangding Lu, Jing'an District, Shanghai, China


Asia’s Best Female Chef 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas

Despite a global pandemic, 2020 was chef DeAille Tam’s year. After embarking on a year-long culinary research trip across China with her life partner and co-chef Simon Wong, in November 2020 she achieved her dream of opening her own restaurant: Obscura in Shanghai. Now, her progressive approach to gastronomy, deep understanding of China’s culinary traditions and leadership in the kitchen and beyond have seen her recognised with the Asia’s Best Female Chef Award 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas.

Born in Hong Kong, Tam was living in Canada and studying for an engineering career when she discovered a passion for cooking. Defying societal expectations of what occupation a Chinese woman should aspire to hold, she followed her instincts and enrolled in the culinary program at George Brown College in Toronto, eventually earning a post-graduate degree in Italian cuisine.

Tam met Wong while studying, and the two trained in Toronto’s kitchens before returning to their native Hong Kong in 2014, where they joined seminal restaurant Bo Innovation. Working with chef Alvin Leung, acclaimed for his bold interpretations of the eight Chinese regional cuisines, the couple rose to be co-head chefs and led the opening of Bo Shanghai in 2016. When the restaurant was awarded a Michelin star in 2017, Tam became the first female chef in Mainland China to hold the honour.

In 2020, having witnessed the turmoil caused by the coronavirus pandemic on the gastronomic industry, Tam and Wong decided to create their own restaurant, where they would bet on their personal interpretation of innovative Chinese cuisine. Obscura, set within the three-storey Tang Xiang Cultural Space, melds the couple’s studies in their country’s rich culinary traditions with an international outlook on ingredients and techniques.

While travelling through China in 2019, Tam came across chen pi, a traditional preparation that sees mandarin peels dried and aged – sometimes for decades – for enhanced flavour. At Obscura, she was inspired to apply the technique to classical French recipe, duck à l’orange. In Tam’s version, the duck is confited and seasoned with a mandarin peel powder and sauce. The dish is completed with duck foie gras, candied and poached mandarin flesh, dehydrated carrot chips and chestnut purée.

The creation represents Tam’s outstanding ability to draw inspiration from China’s millennia-old culinary heritage while seamlessly integrating western inspiration and techniques. Having overcome many difficulties and stereotypes as a young female chef in China, Tam is ready to be a role model for the new generation of cooks and to continue building a promising future for Chinese cuisine.

To discover more, read the interview with DeAille Tam on 50 Best Stories and watch the video:

Contact

Obscura, No. 2, Lane 538 Xikang Lu, near Kangding Lu, Jing'an District, Shanghai, China


Asia’s Best Female Chef 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas

Despite a global pandemic, 2020 was chef DeAille Tam’s year. After embarking on a year-long culinary research trip across China with her life partner and co-chef Simon Wong, in November 2020 she achieved her dream of opening her own restaurant: Obscura in Shanghai. Now, her progressive approach to gastronomy, deep understanding of China’s culinary traditions and leadership in the kitchen and beyond have seen her recognised with the Asia’s Best Female Chef Award 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas.

Born in Hong Kong, Tam was living in Canada and studying for an engineering career when she discovered a passion for cooking. Defying societal expectations of what occupation a Chinese woman should aspire to hold, she followed her instincts and enrolled in the culinary program at George Brown College in Toronto, eventually earning a post-graduate degree in Italian cuisine.

Tam met Wong while studying, and the two trained in Toronto’s kitchens before returning to their native Hong Kong in 2014, where they joined seminal restaurant Bo Innovation. Working with chef Alvin Leung, acclaimed for his bold interpretations of the eight Chinese regional cuisines, the couple rose to be co-head chefs and led the opening of Bo Shanghai in 2016. When the restaurant was awarded a Michelin star in 2017, Tam became the first female chef in Mainland China to hold the honour.

In 2020, having witnessed the turmoil caused by the coronavirus pandemic on the gastronomic industry, Tam and Wong decided to create their own restaurant, where they would bet on their personal interpretation of innovative Chinese cuisine. Obscura, set within the three-storey Tang Xiang Cultural Space, melds the couple’s studies in their country’s rich culinary traditions with an international outlook on ingredients and techniques.

While travelling through China in 2019, Tam came across chen pi, a traditional preparation that sees mandarin peels dried and aged – sometimes for decades – for enhanced flavour. At Obscura, she was inspired to apply the technique to classical French recipe, duck à l’orange. In Tam’s version, the duck is confited and seasoned with a mandarin peel powder and sauce. The dish is completed with duck foie gras, candied and poached mandarin flesh, dehydrated carrot chips and chestnut purée.

The creation represents Tam’s outstanding ability to draw inspiration from China’s millennia-old culinary heritage while seamlessly integrating western inspiration and techniques. Having overcome many difficulties and stereotypes as a young female chef in China, Tam is ready to be a role model for the new generation of cooks and to continue building a promising future for Chinese cuisine.

To discover more, read the interview with DeAille Tam on 50 Best Stories and watch the video:

Contact

Obscura, No. 2, Lane 538 Xikang Lu, near Kangding Lu, Jing'an District, Shanghai, China


Asia’s Best Female Chef 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas

Despite a global pandemic, 2020 was chef DeAille Tam’s year. After embarking on a year-long culinary research trip across China with her life partner and co-chef Simon Wong, in November 2020 she achieved her dream of opening her own restaurant: Obscura in Shanghai. Now, her progressive approach to gastronomy, deep understanding of China’s culinary traditions and leadership in the kitchen and beyond have seen her recognised with the Asia’s Best Female Chef Award 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas.

Born in Hong Kong, Tam was living in Canada and studying for an engineering career when she discovered a passion for cooking. Defying societal expectations of what occupation a Chinese woman should aspire to hold, she followed her instincts and enrolled in the culinary program at George Brown College in Toronto, eventually earning a post-graduate degree in Italian cuisine.

Tam met Wong while studying, and the two trained in Toronto’s kitchens before returning to their native Hong Kong in 2014, where they joined seminal restaurant Bo Innovation. Working with chef Alvin Leung, acclaimed for his bold interpretations of the eight Chinese regional cuisines, the couple rose to be co-head chefs and led the opening of Bo Shanghai in 2016. When the restaurant was awarded a Michelin star in 2017, Tam became the first female chef in Mainland China to hold the honour.

In 2020, having witnessed the turmoil caused by the coronavirus pandemic on the gastronomic industry, Tam and Wong decided to create their own restaurant, where they would bet on their personal interpretation of innovative Chinese cuisine. Obscura, set within the three-storey Tang Xiang Cultural Space, melds the couple’s studies in their country’s rich culinary traditions with an international outlook on ingredients and techniques.

While travelling through China in 2019, Tam came across chen pi, a traditional preparation that sees mandarin peels dried and aged – sometimes for decades – for enhanced flavour. At Obscura, she was inspired to apply the technique to classical French recipe, duck à l’orange. In Tam’s version, the duck is confited and seasoned with a mandarin peel powder and sauce. The dish is completed with duck foie gras, candied and poached mandarin flesh, dehydrated carrot chips and chestnut purée.

The creation represents Tam’s outstanding ability to draw inspiration from China’s millennia-old culinary heritage while seamlessly integrating western inspiration and techniques. Having overcome many difficulties and stereotypes as a young female chef in China, Tam is ready to be a role model for the new generation of cooks and to continue building a promising future for Chinese cuisine.

To discover more, read the interview with DeAille Tam on 50 Best Stories and watch the video:

Contact

Obscura, No. 2, Lane 538 Xikang Lu, near Kangding Lu, Jing'an District, Shanghai, China


Asia’s Best Female Chef 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas

Despite a global pandemic, 2020 was chef DeAille Tam’s year. After embarking on a year-long culinary research trip across China with her life partner and co-chef Simon Wong, in November 2020 she achieved her dream of opening her own restaurant: Obscura in Shanghai. Now, her progressive approach to gastronomy, deep understanding of China’s culinary traditions and leadership in the kitchen and beyond have seen her recognised with the Asia’s Best Female Chef Award 2021, sponsored by Cinco Jotas.

Born in Hong Kong, Tam was living in Canada and studying for an engineering career when she discovered a passion for cooking. Defying societal expectations of what occupation a Chinese woman should aspire to hold, she followed her instincts and enrolled in the culinary program at George Brown College in Toronto, eventually earning a post-graduate degree in Italian cuisine.

Tam met Wong while studying, and the two trained in Toronto’s kitchens before returning to their native Hong Kong in 2014, where they joined seminal restaurant Bo Innovation. Working with chef Alvin Leung, acclaimed for his bold interpretations of the eight Chinese regional cuisines, the couple rose to be co-head chefs and led the opening of Bo Shanghai in 2016. When the restaurant was awarded a Michelin star in 2017, Tam became the first female chef in Mainland China to hold the honour.

In 2020, having witnessed the turmoil caused by the coronavirus pandemic on the gastronomic industry, Tam and Wong decided to create their own restaurant, where they would bet on their personal interpretation of innovative Chinese cuisine. Obscura, set within the three-storey Tang Xiang Cultural Space, melds the couple’s studies in their country’s rich culinary traditions with an international outlook on ingredients and techniques.

While travelling through China in 2019, Tam came across chen pi, a traditional preparation that sees mandarin peels dried and aged – sometimes for decades – for enhanced flavour. At Obscura, she was inspired to apply the technique to classical French recipe, duck à l’orange. In Tam’s version, the duck is confited and seasoned with a mandarin peel powder and sauce. The dish is completed with duck foie gras, candied and poached mandarin flesh, dehydrated carrot chips and chestnut purée.

The creation represents Tam’s outstanding ability to draw inspiration from China’s millennia-old culinary heritage while seamlessly integrating western inspiration and techniques. Having overcome many difficulties and stereotypes as a young female chef in China, Tam is ready to be a role model for the new generation of cooks and to continue building a promising future for Chinese cuisine.

To discover more, read the interview with DeAille Tam on 50 Best Stories and watch the video:

Contact

Obscura, No. 2, Lane 538 Xikang Lu, near Kangding Lu, Jing'an District, Shanghai, China


Watch the video: Entertv: Αυτά είναι τα πιο περίεργα εστιατόρια του κόσμου (August 2022).